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The second beta of iOS 10 leaves more unencrypted parts besides the kernel, but you don’t have to worry

MuscleNerd

As we saw with the release of iOS 10 in its first beta, Apple decided to release the kernel from the operating system. This means no encryption of the code and that anyone could understand how iOS works. The company explained that this is because the kernel itself does not contain any private user information , so they could decrypt it and thus increase the performance of the system.

The second beta of iOS 10 leaves more unencrypted parts besides the kernel, but you don’t have to worryThe second beta of iOS 10 leaves more unencrypted parts besides the kernel, but you don’t have to worry

But it seems that Apple has not stopped at this , since according to MuscleNerd, a well-known developer in the iOS world, the second iOS 10 beta leaves more unencrypted parts in the system.

As you can see in the image attached by MuscleNerd, there are a number of parts that in iOS 10 beta 1 were encrypted and in iOS 10 beta 2 are not:

Safety or speed?

The main reason why parts of the system are no longer encrypted is simply the speed at which they are executed later . For example, if you encrypt virtual memory whenever iOS needs to use it, you have to decrypt and re-encrypt it later, which slows down the system and consumes a lot more resources.

So the dilemma Apple faces is: do we encrypt the whole system or do we leave parts of it unencrypted to improve performance? It seems that with iOS 10 the second way is being followed, where you leave parts unencrypted to increase performance.

Should you be worried?

Logic tells us that if we leave unsecured parts in iOS there is more chance that an external agent will attack the system because it knows better how it works on the inside. But there is really no need to worry about the fact that some parts of iOS 10 are not encrypted, since at no time does Apple leave the user’s data unencrypted .

At no time does Apple leave user data unencrypted

This means that no one can access the user’s private information , not even Apple. Basic system activities that do not pose a danger to customers are simply left unencrypted.

Via