Skip to content

The FCC denies the study that in August claimed that iPhones emitted more radiation than allowed

The Federal Communications Commission, the U.S. agency responsible for regulating telecommunications in the country, has just denied that the iPhone and other terminals exceed the permitted radio frequency radiation limits . This has been made known in a study recently published on its website and echoed in MacRumors. This statement ends the controversy that arose during the summer following a study commissioned by the Chicago Tribune.

A perfectly normal radiation frequency

These are the conclusions reached by the FCC as a result of its study. In the introduction to the study, the agency states that the analysis arises as a result of the statements made by the Chicago Tribune on 21 August 2019. The fact that a media outlet claimed that a number of terminals did not comply with the regulations is something very “serious” for the entity, which is why it began the analysis of the same terminals involved.

The FCC denies the study that in August claimed that iPhones emitted more radiation than allowedThe FCC denies the study that in August claimed that iPhones emitted more radiation than allowed

Specifically, these are the following models:

  • Apple iPhone 7, iPhone X and iPhone XS.
  • Vivo 5 Mini by Blu Products.
  • Moto e5 Play, Moto G6 Play by Motorola.
  • Samsung’s Galaxy S9 and Galaxy J3

The tests have been carried out on the same terminals that were tested by the Tribune at the time. And as we can see, the results leave no room for doubt: all the devices comply with the radiation regulations of radio frequency.

An accusation dismissed by Apple from the outset

Although Apple did not initially comment on the Chicago Tribune study, did leave these statements shortly after the news broke:

At that time, all the terminals analyzed in that study produced results that exceeded what was legally permitted. This indicated that the tests could have been done incorrectly . This was pointed out by Cupertino’s company. Although few people took this analysis seriously at the time, it is true that it takes a long time to repeat the tests in order to completely disprove them.

In XatakaWe measure the radiation emitted by 11 smartphones of the main brands in a laboratory, and this is what we find

Specifically, the FCC has needed almost four months to repeat the tests on all the terminals involved.