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The art of selling a $1,000 app on the App Store that was useless

The applications of the App Store have a free price regulation, it is the developer himself who decides how much their utility costs, and that of the users, to give their opinion if it is worth buying it (independently of the cost).

But let’s not fool ourselves, although Apple users are more likely to pay for the apps we find in the App Store than Android users, we also tend to criticize the prices of the apps. This is something natural for human beings, we criticize everything that can be criticized, for better or for worse and it surely won’t change.

The art of selling a $1,000 app on the App Store that was useless
The art of selling a $1,000 app on the App Store that was useless

This could be the same thing that the developer Armin Heinrich thought and of which he ended up designing an application that was absolutely useless, but adding three magic words in the world of luxury: “I am rich” and an exorbitant price, the maximum that Apple allowed in the App Store in 2008, specifically 999.99 dollars , in Europe it cost 799.99 euros.

The growth of the App Store was booming since its launch, with really interesting applications and very careful by its developers, but they were criticized for their prices, even if they were 0.69 dollars . So our protagonist of the app “I am rich” wanted to do an experiment. Sell an app that didn’t make or bring anything special to the wealthiest users and see what could happen.

This app basically showed a ruby on a velvet background with the following message: “I’m rich. I deserve it. I’m good, healthy and successful” . That’s it, I didn’t offer anything else, just that, the satisfaction of being able to buy something that most of us can’t afford. The funny thing is that it had some buyers, specifically 8, but the most striking thing was that only 2 of them claimed a refund.

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The developer received more criticism than he realized, including phone threats . Apple decided to remove this application from the App Store, even though it was profitable since it pocketed 6,000 dollars gross (you have to discount the percentage that the Californians keep).

Shortly afterwards, Armin Heinrich decided to upload a variant with a more affordable price and the utility of a basic calculator, all for 10.99 euros. In Spain there are still no ratings, while in the American App Store we can see some (and positive), despite the fact that it has not been updated for a couple of years.

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Although the sale of 8 “I’m rich” apps in the App Store didn’t help Armin to become rich, it did generate some unexpected and very succulent benefits for him to develop an app that did nothing special.

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