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On what file system do I format the disk? These are the ones offered by OS X El Capitan

Robert

There are several options to choose from, and each has its advantages and disadvantages.

On what file system do I format the disk? These are the ones offered by OS X El Capitan
On what file system do I format the disk? These are the ones offered by OS X El Capitan

It all depends, as always, on what machines you will be using that disc on and what type of files you will be using on it. But the most important thing before you do your own tests is to warn: formatting a disk means erasing all data unrecoverably. If you already have that in mind, let’s see what file systems we can use.

HFS+

This is the file format used by OS X , the system cannot be installed if the partition is not formatted in HFS+. Therefore, the Mac’s internal hard drive must be formatted on that system, or at least one of its partitions. Time Machine, the OS X backup tool, requires the same.

Note: This file system does not work on Windows systems unless you install additional applications. So if you are using OS X in parallel with Windows, HFS+ is not recommended.

HFS+ (Shift.Min.)

There is an alternate format of the HFS+ system, capable of distinguishing between upper and lower case in the file name. It is not recommended to use this system to install OS X , as there are quite a few applications that simply cannot be installed. This is a system intended for expert UNIX users, who have applications that work with that type of format.

MS-DOS (FAT)

This is Apple’s way of mentioning FAT32, one of the most widely used file systems because it is compatible with both Mac and Windows. It is the system on which most USB flash drives are formatted for convenience.

There is a problem: as it is a very old system it does not support the storage of files larger than 4 GB . It is therefore only recommended for those USB sticks where smaller file sizes will be temporarily stored.

ExFAT

Evolution of the FAT32 system in which files larger than 4 GB can be stored, initially intended for memory cards. If you need a disk to store big files and at the same time you want to use it in Windows and OS X, you can try with ExFAT.

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