Skip to content

iFixit puts its claws into the iPad Pro’s Smart Keyboard to admire its interior

After learning what the interior of the Apple Pencil in the iPad Pro looked like, iFixit was slow to show us the insides of the Smart Keyboard, which is the must-have accessory along with the stylus . There’s not much to be surprised about in this disassembly, but those of us who like to know what’s underneath every Apple device, it never hurts to take a look .

The most interesting thing is its conductive fabric construction, the inner shape of the keys and the circuitry that gives life to the keyboard . iFixit highlights the high quality of the fabric, which seems to be made of nylon given its feel. Once they get inside by cutting it with a cutter, we can see the keys where the space bar is designed so that it can be pressed comfortably from any position.

iFixit puts its claws into the iPad Pro’s Smart Keyboard to admire its interioriFixit puts its claws into the iPad Pro’s Smart Keyboard to admire its interior

The circuitry is at one end of the keyboard, where indicator LEDs or cooling systems are absent due to the thinness of the keyboard. Once the frame that gives rigidity to the assembly is removed, some breathing channels appear that allow us to relieve the air pressure every time we press a key , which comes out from the top of the keyboard.

Returning to the motherboard, the brain is commanded by a microcontroller based on ARM architecture, and manufactured by STMicroelectronics, along with a final layer of three strips of cloth at the base of the keyboard. They are made of Apple’s “conductive fabric”, which connects the Smart Keyboard to the iPad Pro’s Smart Connector. This allows the flow of data and electricity, which should last the entire life of the keyboard .

Finally, iFixit gives the iPad Pro’s Smart Keyboard a score of 0 out of 10, probably the lowest ever given to an Apple product . This is because it is literally impossible to repair, the fact that the fabric has to be slit to access it would make it unusable after the operation. In spite of this, it looks like a very robust device, and it would be difficult for any of its internal components to fail, rendering it useless.