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Gedeon Madeux, developer of Twitterrific, explains why the future of Twitter clients on the Mac is black

Buffer para iOS 8, aprovecha al máximo sus nuevas posibilidades

If there is one thing that Twitter clients for Mac have in common, it is that have not been updated for a long time . And if you look further, iOS clients suffer from this lack as well. But according to the developer of one of these clients, Gedeon Madeux, it is not the programmers who are to blame but Twitter itself .

Gedeon Madeux, developer of Twitterrific, explains why the future of Twitter clients on the Mac is blackGedeon Madeux, developer of Twitterrific, explains why the future of Twitter clients on the Mac is black

The reason? Well the limit of tokens (or users who can identify themselves in a third party Twitter client to use the service) that the microblogging network limited a couple of years ago. That made those clients unusable after 100,000 users identified themselves on it, a figure that doesn’t allow those applications to be marketed properly. Whether they are free or paid.

In the specific case of Twitterrific, its developers decided to park progress with version 5 of their Mac client and prioritize the update they released for iOS 7 when it was released. That left Twitterrific for Mac half-done, and the work that was done ended up in the trash with the arrival of OS X Yosemite. Everything has to be redone from scratch , and given the outlook there is not much initiative to do it.

The bad news, however, is that the future of third party Twitter clients on Mac and other platforms is straightforwardly bleak . Developers don’t see the point of working on an application that won’t be usable by everyone, and Apple is moving too fast for what it did a year ago to remain valid.

The rules that Twitter has applied to its third party customers nullify its future at the root

Of course, the advantage of this is taken by the official Twitter clients and the service website. Even the website has more of an advantage, as the service’s news is always immediately reflected on the website and then later on the iOS and OS X customers.

Anyway, you see: at the moment I wouldn’t count too much on unofficial Twitter clients to update themselves . And let’s not point out the people in charge, but rather the measures that the service is applying to its community of developers. A pity, really.

At Apple